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Lectures I have viewed
1. Ancient China - Dr. Charles Keller
2. Modern China - Dr. Ari Levine
3. Ancient and Modern Japan - Dr. Karl Friday
4. Korean History and Culture - Professor Mi Ran Kim
5. Chinese theatre and drama - Dr. Steven Liu
6. Chinese Art – Dr. Julia Li
7. Japanese Language and Literature – Dr. Masaki Mori
8. Chinese/Japanese Art- Dr. Huang
9. Korean language and literature - Dr. HyangSoon Yi
10 Chinese literature - Dr. Tom Ganschow




Lesson Plan 1: Haiku
Class- Writing
3rd-5th grade

Standards Addressed (4th grade Georgia Performance Standards)
ELA4R1 The student demonstrates comprehension and shows evidence of a
warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational
texts.

ELA4W2 The student demonstrates competence in a variety of genres.

Placed in Unit
This lesson would be an introduction to Japanese Poetry form-Haiku

General Goals
Ø Students will experience the Japanese Poetry form-Haiku through reading and writing

Specific Objectives
Ø Students will be able to correctly identify the specific format of a Haiku
Ø Students will gain background knowledge about where a Haiku comes from
Ø Students will be able to produce their own Haiku

Materials
Ø Computer with projector set-up
Ø Internet
Ø Wabi Sabi by Mark Reibstein Illustrated by Ed Young
Ø Paper
Ø Pencils
Ø Haiku: the mood of the earth by Ann Atwood

Opening
Teacher will either read aloud the book, Wabi Sabi, or play the youtube video read aloud
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=699uLKmQsOw

Ø After the read aloud, teacher will facilitate a discussion with the students about the story.
Ø Some sample discussion questions:
o What did Wabi Sabi learn about her name?
o What does Wabi Sabi mean to you?
o What kinds of literature are used in the story?
o What is a Haiku?

Work Session
Ø The teacher will put sample haikus on the board from the story
o “Poor Wabi Sabi!/ As simple as a brown leaf./ So ordinary!”
o “Even in cities,/ before the shock of new light/—the colors of dusk.”
o “The pale moon resting/ on foggy water. Hear that/ splash? A frog’s jumped in!
Ø The teacher will ask what similarities the students see in the haikus, and ask if they can come up with some predictions of what the standard haiku rules might be
Ø The students will then briefly practice counting out syllables in the examples to build a foundation for creating their own haiku
Ø After a brief discussion, the teacher will explain
o A haiku is a form of Japanese poetry that uses a 5-7-5 syllable pattern and must be referenced to nature. It was developed in the 17th century by a master named Matsuo Basho.
Ø Now the students will have an opportunity to write their own haikus using the rules

Closing
Ø If time allows, students may share their writing with the class
Ø Students will watch another video from the author and illustrator of Wabi Sabi on how they were inspired to create this book
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ca2Ly4Vpb5Y


Differentiation
Ø If students are having a hard time getting started the teacher may give them a topic on nature, or they may look through Wabi Sabi.
Ø Students may also look at the book, haiku: the mood of the earth by Ann Atwood, for examples and ideas.

Extension
Ø Students may create their own book of haikus, or story complete with illustrations inspired by the pictures in Wabi Sabi created by Ed Young

Lesson Plan 2: Ballad of Mulan
Class: Writing
4th-5th grades
Standards Addressed (4th grade Georgia Performance Standards)
ELA4R1 The student demonstrates comprehension and shows evidence of a
warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational
texts.

ELA4W2 The student demonstrates competence in a variety of genres.

ELA4C1 The student demonstrates understanding and control of the rules of
the English language, realizing that usage involves the appropriate application
of conventions and grammar in both written and spoken formats.

ELA4LSV2 The student listens to and views various forms of text and media in
order to gather and share information, persuade others, and express and understand ideas.

Placed in Unit
This is a two-day mini unit on comparing a contrasting two types of literacy

General Goals
Ø The students will be able to evaluate different forms of literacy with a critical approach

Specific Objectives
Ø Effectively compare and contrast two forms of the same story
Ø Comprehend different types of literacy

Materials
Ø “The Ballad of Mulan” translated from Chinese into English http://www.chinapage.com/mulan.html
Ø Fa Mulan by Robert D. San Souci
Ø The Ballad of Mulan by Song Nan Zhang
Ø Wild Orchid: A retelling of “The Ballad of Mulan” by Cameron Dokey
Ø Video of Mulan by Disney
Ø Paper
Ø Pencil

Opening
Day 1
Ø The teacher will hand out copies of the “Ballad of Mulan” from the website above
Ø The teacher will facilitate a discussion of the main ideas of the poem, the characters, etc.

Day 2
Ø The teacher will read either Fa Mulan, or The Ballad of Mulan book
Ø The teacher will lead the students in a discussion of the main points of the story (plot, characters, setting, etc).

Work Session
Day 1
Ø Students will watch Disney’s Mulan
Ø While watching they will take notes of the main points of the story as depicted in the movie
Day 2
Ø Students will take the notes from the movie, and the notes from the poem and write a comparative literature essay.
o The students will be focusing on the differences between the ballad written in 5 C.E. compared to the version Disney adapted.

Closing
Day 1
Ø Students will share their favorite part of the movie

Day 2
Ø Students will share their essays

Differentiation
Ø Students could also set up their essay as a double bubble map (venn diagram)

Extension
Ø Students could read Wild Orchid: A retelling of “The Ballad of Mulan” and include in their essay
Ø Students could create a glog highlighting the similarities and differences found
Ø Students could research other stories or folktales that have been changed or adapted from the original


Lesson Plan 3: 1,000 Paper Cranes
Class: Reading
5th grade

Standards Addressed (5th grade Georgia Performance Standards)
ELA5R1 The student demonstrates comprehension and shows evidence of a warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational texts.

SS5H6 The student will explain the reasons for America’s involvement in World War II.
a. Describe Germany’s aggression in Europe and Japan’s aggression in Asia.
b. Describe major events in the war in both Europe and the Pacific; Harbor, Iwo Jima, D-Day, VE and VJ Days, and the Holocaust.
c. Discuss President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Placed in Unit
This would be a extension lesson to do while the students are learning about WWII in social studies

General Goals
Ø Students will be able to make connections between Japan’s position in WWII to Sadako’s story and the message for peace

Specific Objectives
Ø Students will be able to make an origami crane
Ø Students will be able to identify the parts of the story
Ø Students will be able to make connections to Sadako’s story

Materials
Ø Computer with internet and projection capabilities
Ø Sadako by Eleanor Coerr Illustrated by Ed Young
Ø Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes By Eleanor Coerr Paintings by Ronald Himler
Ø Origami paper
Ø Pencils

Opening
Ø Students will watch a BBC video about the atomic bomb hitting Hiroshima http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NF4LQaWJRDg
Ø The teacher will reference the topics the students have been learning about in social studies and introduce the historical fiction story of Sadako

Work Session
Ø The teacher will read the story of Sadako and describe the parts of the story
Ø The teacher will discuss the message of peace that Sadako was trying to spread. What is peace? How can you spread the message of peace? How did Sadako spread the message of peace?
Ø Introduce the origami crane and have students write on their piece of origami paper: Sakako’s message of peace, and their own wish for peace
Ø Show the video of how to make a crane http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=es-vMeZy9HA
Ø Students may make more cranes if time allows

Closing
Ø Students will share their cranes and explain what peace means to them

Differentiation
Ø If students are having trouble folding the cranes, the teacher may have copies of a picture of a crane that students may write on and illustrate, or the teacher may make extra cranes for students

Extension
Ø Students can make their own version of Sadako. The following youtube video is an example. Students can video tape their story or can create a reader’s theater script http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nKr-KshtF2I
Ø Students can continue to make the paper cranes throughout the year to get to 1,000 and the class can send them to Japan along with a class wish for peace
Ø Other stories about origami are
o Little Oh by Laura Krauss Melmed Illustrated by Jim LaMarche
o Pink Paper Swans by Virginia Kroll Illustrated by Nancy L. Clouse


Lesson Plan 4: Lunar New Year
Class- Reading or Writing
4th or 5th grade
Standards Addressed
ELA4R1 The student demonstrates comprehension and shows evidence of a
warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational
texts.

ELA4W2 The student demonstrates competence in a variety of genres.

ELA4C1 The student demonstrates understanding and control of the rules of
the English language, realizing that usage involves the appropriate application
of conventions and grammar in both written and spoken formats.

Placed in Unit
This would be one of the lessons given on comparing and contrasting literature
General Goals
Ø Comprehend information on Lunar New Year
Specific Objectives
Ø Compare Lunar New Year to American New Year
Ø Be able to write an essay using conventions of writing
Materials
Ø Celebrating Chinese New Year by Diane Hoyt-Goldsmith
Ø Chinese New Year For Kids by Cindy Roberts
Ø Dragon Dance: A Chinese New Year LTF by Joan Holub and Benrei Huang
Ø The Dancing Dragon by Marcia K. Vaughan
Ø Hiss! Pop! Boom! Celebrating Chinese New Year by Tricia Morrissey
Ø The Lunar New Year's Tree by Thiphan Do
Ø Lunar New Year for Kids by Cindy Roberts
Ø Computer with projector capabilities and internet
Ø Pencil and paper

Opening
Ø This is a video from the Asian society about the Korean New Year
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G2Y8BwMCJ5s
Ø The students will watch the video and take notes
Ø The teacher will conduct a brief discussion about American New Year
Ø The teacher will write key facts on the board that the students say about American New Year

Work Session
  1. The students will choose a book from the list above or go to the school media center and choose a book on the Lunar New Year, Chinese New Year, or Korean New Year.
  2. students will take notes on the traditions and customs provided in the book
  3. using the notes from the book, notes from the movie, and discussion held in the beginning of class the students will compare and contrast Asian New Year to American New Year using a Venn Diagram
  4. The students will then take the Venn Diagram graphic organizer and use to make a comparative essay

Closing
Ø The students will get to share experiences they have had during a Lunar or American New Year
Ø Students will be able to share their essays

Differentiation
Ø Students could look up information from the internet using a reputable source (no wikipedia) and write the essay with internet source
Extension
Ø The class could have a Lunar New Year celebration. The students could research different customs, food, decorations, and clothing that would be necessary to have the celebration