List of lectures viewed or attended:
1. Ancient China - Dr. Charles Keller
2. Modern China - Dr. Ari Levine
3. Ancient and Modern Japan - Dr. Karl Friday
4. Korean History and Culture - Professor Mi Ran Kim
5. Chinese theatre and drama - Dr. Steven Liu
6. Celebrating Lunar New Year in China and Vietnam - Dr. Karen Kane
7. How to Look at a Chinese Painting - Mr. Maxwell Hearn
8. Japanese Art: Keys to Understanding - Dr. Matthew McKelway
9. Korean language and literature - Dr. HyangSoon Yi
10 Chinese literature - Dr. Tom Ganschow

Lesson Plan 1
Theatre Class
Student: Upper level high school (11th and 12th grade)

Comments: The ignorance in modern audiences to the costumes - lost due to the Cultural Revolution - further lesson with the model operas

Standards Addressed: Georgia Theatre Fine Arts Standards

  • TAHSTLI1 - Analyzing and constructing meaning from theatrical experiences, dramatic literature, and electronic media
  • TAHSTLI4 - Designing and executing artistic and technical elements of theatre
  • TAHSTLI6 - Researching cultural and historical information to support artistic choices
  • TAHSTLI8 - Examining the roles of theatre as a reflection of past and present civilizations

Place in Overall Unit: This lesson would follow the introductory lessons to Beijing Opera, which would concern the history of the art form and its place in society.

General Goals: Students will understand the importance of Beijing Opera costumes to the art form and its place in Chinese history.

Specific objectives: Students will understand how the semiotics of costume help connoisseurs of the art recognize how each character fits into the story of the opera.
-Students will be able to identify how Beijing Opera costumes point to the ethnic issues between the Han and Manchu peoples during the Qing dynasty.

Required materials: Projector for computer, internet connection, YouTube video Ye Shen Chun

Anticipatory Set: The video Ye Shen Chun will be played via YouTube. Students will be instructed to guess at what each character might be based on their costumes.

Step by Step Procedures:

  • Students will discuss with their neighbors why they feel the costumes fit specific characters. The instructor will have the students report on the clown, general, and warrior pictures in the video to see if the class guessed correctly. The instructor will not, however, tell the students if they're right just yet.
  • The instructor will explain that a knowledge of costumes is critical for the connoisseur of Beijing Opera.
  • Details of the sheng, dan, jing, and chou characters will be given through a power point presentation
  • The students will then watch the Ye Shen Chun video again to attempt to identify the sheng, dan, jing, and chou characters.
  • Students will divide into two groups to check their answers and come up with the one answer for the group to challenge the other half of the class. The one with the most correct answers is rewarded.
  • The class will reconvene, and the instructor will go through important points about color and style in costumes, making special note of the Han and Manchu styles.
  • The two groups will then be given a chance to discuss and create costumes for a Han or Manchu character.

Closure: Students will reflect on which Beijing Opera type most suits them and will tell the instructor on the way out the door.

Assessment: Students will be given a set of cards detailing aspects of a Beijing opera character (warrior, romantic hero, female warrior, evil, goodhearted, etc), and based on the qualifications given, the students will create a costume for that character. They will write an accompanying paragraph detailing why they chose those costume pieces for their character. Half the class will have a Han character and half will have a Manchu style character in anticipation of the anticipatory set for the next class (a re-enactment of what it would be like to sit in an audience with the Han and Manchu at a Beijing Opera).

Adaptations (for students with learning challenges): The assessment will be done in a mix and match form using cut up printouts of Beijing Opera costumes. Students will need to explain one thing they see in each piece that points to something about the character in the photograph.

Extensions (for gifted students): Gifted students will be required to also include specific color choices in their costumes and an explanation for why those colors were chosen.

Connections to Other Subjects:
History: The differences between traditional Beijing Opera and the model operas of the Cultural Revolution can be used to demonstrate the severity of the period in Chinese history. In addition, the shifting laws with regard to the festivals can be examined, especially with regard to the Chinese New Year.
Economics:
The marketing and production of Beijing Opera throughout history could be examined and discussed.
Literature: Great classics of the Beijing Opera could be discussed for style, content, and form.

Lesson Plan 2
Theatre Class
Student: Upper level high school (11th and 12th grade)

Standards Addressed: Georgia Theatre Fine Arts Standards

  • TAHSTLI1 - Analyzing and constructing meaning from theatrical experiences, dramatic literature, and electronic media
  • TAHSTLI4 - Designing and executing artistic and technical elements of theatre
  • TAHSTLI6 - Researching cultural and historical information to support artistic choices
  • TAHSTLI8 - Examining the roles of theatre as a reflection of past and present civilizations



Place in Overall Unit: This lesson would serve as the introduction to Kabuki, which will place the theatre form in the context of the history of the country and its place in society.

General Goals: Students will be able to explain the significance of Kabuki in Japanese culture.

Specific objectives: Students will understand how the stories of Kabuki fit with the culture of the shogun.
-Students will learn the basic styles of Kabuki and begin placing stories within their historical context.

Required materials: White board, markers, projector for computer, internet connection, access to YouTube videos

Anticipatory Set: The students will be told that they are about to watch a video about the art of Kabuki (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YBnTF9RggF0). Their task during the video is to take notes on the differences in theatrical practice from their own theatrical experience.



Step by Step Procedures:

  • The students will divide into groups of 4 to make a definitive list of the differences they noticed in the video.
  • The instructor will allow one representative of each group to write their lists on the board.
  • The list will be discussed as a group.
  • The teacher will then go through the powerpoint quiz to discuss the history of the start of Kabuki and the history of the shogun.
  • The lists of differences will then be discussed to see if the students can recognize some of the historical implications of the performance.
  • The homework reading will then be distributed to the students (Kanjincho, Kitsunebi, and Sasaki Takatsuna).

Closure: Students will write down two or three of the stylistic differences to look for during their reading of Kanjincho, Kitsunebi, and Sasaki Takatsuna (located at http://www.aichi-gakuin.ac.jp/~jeffreyb/kabuki.html).

Assessment: Students will be quizzed in the next class on the plot points of the three stories as well as the performance techniques discussed in class.

Adaptations (for students with learning challenges): The readings can be done with a paraprofessional. In addition, the number of readings can be reduced or the stories can be summarized and told to the student by a paraprofessional.


Extensions (for gifted students): Gifted students will be asked to research the background of the stories to identify the historical period in which they were written, the style of Kabuki performance, and the playwright (if possible).
Connections to Other Subjects:
History: This lesson would work well with a discussion of the Edo and Tokugawa eras in Japan. Since the development of Kabuki goes along with the era of the shogun, the.
Literature: Since many Kabuki stories deal with the parting of lovers and their subsequent suicide, this lesson could be combined with a unit on Romeo and Juliet. The comparison of the two stories would give insight into the cultural differences between Japan and England.


Lesson Plan 3
Theatre Class
Student: Upper level high school (11th and 12th grade)

Standards Addressed: Georgia Theatre Fine Arts Standards
  • TAHSTLI1 - Analyzing and constructing meaning from theatrical experiences, dramatic literature, and electronic media
  • TAHSTLI6 - Researching cultural and historical information to support artistic choices
  • TAHSTLI8 - Examining the roles of theatre as a reflection of past and present civilizations

Place in Overall Unit: This lesson would follow the introductory lessons to Kabuki, which would concern its history. The practical side of Kabuki acting will be highlighted in this lesson.

General Goals: Students will practice the vocal and movement stylings of Kabuki.

Specific objectives: Students will experience the physical motion and vocal stylings of Kabuki performers.
-Students will be able to identify how the stylized acting of the Kabuki theatre conveys emotion to the audience.
-Students will be able to identify how the emotions of Kabuki would appeal to the audience in its original time period.

Required materials: Projector for computer, internet connection, Kabuki video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=67-bgSFJiKc



Anticipatory Set: The students will be led through a series of warm up exercise that emphasize long, slow movements. When they are comfortable with the movement, they will be asked to add sounds that correspond to the movements. The movements and the sounds should be extended and played with to approximate a mei pose before introducing the poses.

Step by Step Procedures:
  • Once the students are warmed up, have them attempt the same sort of long movements and sounds with specific emotions attached to them, such as anger, joy, fierceness before battle, and love.
  • The students will then break to watch a short video on Kabuki, which will remind them of both the historical place of the art form as well as demonstrating the vocal and movement techniques.
  • A quick discussion of the movement and vocal styles will follow the videos, highlighting the importance of the mei and the specific style it represents.
  • The class will also discuss how the culture of the shogun would respond the themes of honor and the emotional acting style.
  • The students will then watch the video again specifically to mimic the meis being performed during the piece.
  • Students will divide into pairs to create short, Kabuki-style recreations of common, everyday events, such as saying hello, waiting for a bus, and working on homework.
  • The students will then perform the short scenes for each other.

Closure: Students must strike their best mei pose for the teacher as they depart.

Assessment: Students will be required to reread the Kabuki stories from the previous lesson, looking specifically for places where the acting would reach an emotional level.

Adaptations (for students with learning challenges): The physical aspect of the lesson can be done more slowly or with the help of a paraprofessional. The vocal stylings can be reproduced for those

Extensions (for gifted students): Gifted students will be required to rewrite a section of Death of a Salesman to fit Kabuki style.

Connections to Other Subjects:
Art: The mei pose is a large part of the poster stylings of Kabuki. Art plays an important role in the creation and performance of Kabuki, and the style of art could be both studied and recreated.
Literature: Zeami's description of acting styles could be studied as a work of both Japanese literature as well as an important theatrical document.

Lesson Plan 4
Theatre Class
Student: Upper level high school (11th and 12th grade)

Standards Addressed: Georgia Theatre Fine Arts Standards
  • TAHSTLI6 - Researching cultural and historical information to support artistic choices
  • TAHSTLI8 - Examining the roles of theatre as a reflection of past and present civilizations

Place in Overall Unit: This lesson would be in a unit regarding origin theories of theatre. The idea of performance within cultural rituals will have already been discussed as well as the rituals of the Yoruba.

General Goals: The students will examine the role of the mudang (shaman) in traditional Korean culture.

Specific objectives: Students will be able to identify the importance of the mudang in village life.
-Students will be able to articulate the performative aspects of the mudang's ritual
-Students will compare the mudang rituals with the Yoruba rituals previously studied in class.

Required materials: Projector for computer, internet connection

Anticipatory Set: As a precursor to the discussion about the shaman's perceived ability to speak with the dead, the students will write down what they would say to someone who had died as well as what they would ask for help with in their lives.

Step by Step Procedures:
  • The students will extend their anticipatory set by writing a full paragraph describing the benefits of being able to communicate with and ask for help from the dead.
  • The students will then be shown several videos of the mudang rituals to demonstrate the dances and rituals of the mudang.





  • The class will then discuss whether religious ceremonies can be considered performance.
  • The students will then take time to read "Dancing on Knives," an introduction to Korean shamanism (located at http://heinzinsufenkl.net/knives.html)
  • In small groups, the students will discuss how what they saw in the video relates to the shamanism described in the article.

Closure: Each student will write a paragraph answering the question "Is shamanism a type of performance?" and defending their answer.

Assessment: The information on the mudang and their place in the Korean culture will be a part of the midterm exam.

Adaptations (for students with learning challenges): The "Dancing with Knives" reading can be replaced with the summary of the mudang from Theatre Histories by by Phillip B. Zarrilli, Bruce McConachie, Gary Jay Williams, and Carol Fisher Sorgenfrei

Extensions (for gifted students): The film, Mudang, will be sent home with the gifted students. As an anticipatory set to the next lesson, the gifted students will explain what they learned from watching this documentary on the shaman rituals.

Connections to Other Subjects:
History: The split between North and South Korea still dominates the headlines today. Discussion of global politics and diplomacy would work well with this lesson.
Art: An excellent collection of Korean shaman art can be found online (http://www.duke.edu/~myhan/kaf0911.pdf). These paintings could be both imitated and discussed.